Schedule: Monday - Sunday - 00:00 - 24:00

Al-Anon

The Brief History Of Al-Anon

Al-Anon is support groups all over the world that where people affected by alcoholism in one way or another meet to share experiences and help each other. This kind of a support group is after assisting people overcome their addiction to alcohol.


Al Anon was founded in 1951 and is an organization which provides support to the friends and family members of people who are addicted to alcohol. Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is the first alcoholic support group that was started by the husband of Lois Wilson who went on to later start her own support group, Al-Anon. She formed an organization for people similar to her, after confronting the hardships of assisting a recovering alcoholic in her own life. Al-Anon is a self-supported organization which exists thanks to financial contributions from members. Meetings are available to assist family members and friends of alcoholics adjust and better serve their loved ones, even if their loved ones have not recovered.


The fight against alcoholism is a joint undertaking and that is the objective of this support group.


Alcoholism Affecting A Family

Al-Anon sees alcoholism as a family illness, because it negatively affects both the drinkers and people around them. The recovery process is a joint effort and the family members and other people close to the addict must be involved.

Helping the addict recuperate should be the main concern of the family members and the friends. Support meetings can help deal about these issues in the best way while also making members understand that alcoholism should be treated as a family illness.


Alateen- Al-Anon Meetings For Teenagers

A particular group called Alateen assists young people impacted by alcoholism in their family is also run by Al-Anon.

Young people are permitted to meet with others of their own age at these meetings, making the experiences more similar and advantageous.


The Benefits Of Attending An Al-Anon Group

The people in the group are struggling like you or are going through what you are experiencing as a victim of alcoholism. The best part about this program is that you can all relate with the same issue. With this program, you get to share experiences with people who have faced situations similar to yours. Al-Anon meetings are held throughout the nation. Contact us on 0800 246 1509 for assistance in locating a group near you.


Expectations For A Meeting

Al-Anon meetings are open for anybody who is affected by someone else's drinking habit. You just need to identify whether the alcoholism of a particular individual is concerning you and make it known it is affecting your lifestyle, and rest assured that Al-Anon can provide the assistance you need.

Some of the attendees are reluctant to go to their first meeting because they do not know what to expect. What you must remember when you attend an Al-Anon meeting:

  • Al-Anon is an anonymous group, and this can be considered as extremely important
  • Whether personally or through a family member, everyone in each meeting has been impacted by alcoholism
  • While members are encouraged to speak up and discuss their problem, they are under no obligation to do so
  • The Meetings Usually Vary
  • You may find some more beneficial to you than others.
  • Al-Anon is not an organization which is based on any religion
  • The 12 recovery steps are followed in this group

Al-Anon meetings are carried out under a slogan that encourages all attendees to "take only what they like, leaving the rest." In this way, instead of telling attendees what they should do, meetings target on exchanging experiences and difficulties.


Ready to Get Help?

CALL US NOW ON 0800 246 1509



Al-Anon And The Twelve Steps

Most meetings begin with a reading of Al Anon 12 Step program. Adapted, from the 12 Step program of Alcoholics Anonymous, these steps are nearly straight sword. Al-Anon members start with a sponsor who assists them work through the steps and who is ready for help in times of difficulty, mostly similar to AA. The 12 Steps are as follows:

  • We admit that we were powerless over alcohol that our lives had become unmanageable.
  • Members can learn to accept alcoholism as a disease which they cannot control in others.
  • Came to believe that a power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.
  • members also learn they are driving themselves crazy by trying to change or control another person.
  • When they understand they cannot do anything to change their loved one, people are now able to accept they can relax and let go for their peace of mind.
  • Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.
  • Accepting the condition and seeking help is the best way of solving it.
  • Carry out a thorough and undaunted moral inventory of ourselves.
  • A huge part of the steps are self-discovery, and this is the beginning of the procedure.
  • A list of how they may have offended themselves or their loved ones (such as with threats) is made by attendees.
  • Have admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the true cause of our wrong doings.
  • Permitting them to dig into each issue, this is an examination of every thing in the members moral inventory.
  • Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.
  • Spiritual help is recognised as one way through which they can be helped.
  • Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.
  • This part of the 12 steps provides members with the assistance needed to understand how they may have been exercising control or being judgmental towards an addict and how these actions are counterproductive.
  • Made a list of all persons we had harmed and be willing to make amends with them.
  • Very often, righting a wrong starts with yourself.
  • Many people blame themselves for their loved ones addiction.
  • They must be willing and prepared to forgive themselves and to make amends.
  • Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.
  • After you are willing to make amends, the following step is to act on it.
  • Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.
  • It takes some period before you can complete the stages.
  • Slipping up is quite normal despite members already having made an inventory.
  • Step 10 identifies this is an ongoing process.
  • Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious effort with god as we understood him praying only for the knowledge of his will and the power to carry that out.
  • This step is a personal, spiritual one; it comprises acceptance and comfort in view of the great stress of recovery.
  • Having had a spiritual awakening as a result of these steps we tried to carry this message to others and to practice these principles in our affairs.
  • Step 12 involves the member acknowledging the story has not ended.
  • Encouragement is provided to members to support other members with their education.

Learning About The Higher Power

Members do have an acceptance of a higher power, even though Al-Anon is not a religious program. Every member has their own religion affiliation. Members of all religions and beliefs are accepted at Al-Anon and none is coerced to change their beliefs.