Schedule: Monday - Sunday - 00:00 - 24:00

Talk To Frank

What Is Talk To Frank?

The longest running anti-drug campaign in the UK is Talk to Frank. Though, has the campaign stopped anybody from using any drugs?

A police Swat team in the UK burst into a kitchen of a quiet suburban home, and the results were a complete turnaround of the way drug education was done for good. Out went horrid notices of how medications could "mess you up" and sincere appeals to oppose the vile pushers prowling in each play area. Instead, wit and fun including games were embraced.


The first advert presented an adolescent inviting the police to come and arrest his mum because the mum wanted them to talk about drugs. The message, "Drugs are illegal. Talking about them isn't. So Talk to Frank", was brand new as well.


Frank: Friendly Confidential Drug Advice

An idea that started with someone's mother, Frank was now the new name of the National Drugs Helpline. It was supposed to be the symbol of a reliable older brother that younger individuals can go to for guidance regarding illegal substances. To become a familiar brand with youth in the UK, the Frank label has presented everything from the adventures of pablo the drug mule to a tour of a brain warehouse.


Significantly, Frank was never found in the flesh, so would never be the objective of joke for wearing the wrong trainers or attempting to be "down with the children," says Justin Tindall, inventive director of ad organization Leo Burnett. Even the YouTube videos that spoof Frank are respectful. One more thing that distinguishes Frank from other government-funded campaigns is that nothing links the ad to the government in anyway whatsoever.

Teaching people about drugs is now approached in a different way, not like the days of Nancy Reagan in the UK and the cast of Grange Hill in the UK, who told us to "Just Say No" to drugs; it is evident this did not work.


Like the Frank campaign, most European ads now focus on giving unbiased information so that young people can make up their own minds. In nations with solid punishments for ownership, pictures of jail bars and disgraced guardians are still typical. A recent campaign launched in Singapore informed young people who visit clubs, "You play, you pay".

Above the Influence is a campaign that mixes jokes and warning stories that the federal government has been using in the UK for a long time; it also offers positive alternatives to drugs. The accentuation is on conversing with youngsters in their own particular dialect - one promotion demonstrates a group of "stoners" marooned on a couch. However, an amazing number of anti-drug battles far and wide still fall back on terrify strategies and specifically, the drug driven "fall into hell." A classic illustration is a current Canadian business, part of the DrugsNot4Me arrangement, which demonstrates an appealing, sure young lady's change into a shuddering and hollow eyed smash-up on account of "drugs."

According to studies into a United States anti-drugs campaign between 1999 and 2004, advertisements showing the undesirable effects of substance abuse can frequently urge younger people who are marginalised to experiment with substances.


By demonstrating how the drugs affect the use, giving the highs and lows, Frank was not supported by the Conservative politicians on the new path it had taken.


Cocaine makes you feel on top of the world was one of its preliminary ads online.

Hitting the middle road with an ad to give the right message always proved to be a challenge. According to the then creative director of digital agency Profero, Matt Powell, who designed the ad, he was wrong in believing that a normal web user has an adequate attention span. There will be many who could not have seen the adverse effects of the drugs at the end of the animation. However, Powell says the point was to be more legitimate with youngsters about medications, keeping in mind the end goal to build up the believability of the Frank brand.

One survey said that 67 percent of young people would call Frank if they needed advice about drugs. 225,892 calls were made to the Frank helpline and 3,341,777 visits to the site in 2011/12. For him, this shows that the campaign is very successful.

Though the response is good, it is no evidence that Frank just like other available anti-drug campaigns has discouraged people from indulging in drugs.

Drug usage in the UK has gone around 9% in the decade since the conflict propelled, yet specialists say quite a bit of this is down to a decrease in cannabis utilization, potentially connected to changing states of mind towards smoking tobacco among youngsters.


What Is Frank?

FRANK is a state drug education services together settled by the by the Department of Health and Home Office of the British government in 2003. It's main aim is to inform young people about the dangers of alcohol and drugs, so as to bring down the rate of consumption of both legal and illegal drugs. It has run numerous media promotions on radio and the web.


Ready to Get Help?

CALL US NOW ON 0800 246 1509



Services

FRANK has the following resources for anyone looking for information about drugs:

  • A website
  • 24/7 anonymous telephone number
  • Email
  • A classified live chat facility, accessible from 2pm-6pm everyday
  • A service to help find appropriate counselling or treatment